Something in the (Spa) Water…

Water glass with fresh berries and mint

Some of my friends just don’t like drinking their H2O. Some people can only drink water if it is icy-cold… for others, it has to be cool but not room-temperature… and I’ve known quite a few people who say that they “just don’t like the taste” of water.

All preferences aside, our bodies need to get hydration from somewhere. Although many animals (I’m looking at you, Dromedary) can go for a while without taking a drink, we humans aren’t prepared to store all the water we need.

H2O and You

You may have heard reminders about drinking water, during our current heat wave. You especially need to stay hydrated if you:

  • Work outside or spend time in the sun
  • Have a strenuous occupation
  • Have diabetes or heart disease
  • Are taking any kind of medications that cause frequent urination
  • Are frequently exercising
  • Perspire heavily

These are just some examples.

How to make hydration more appealing

Technology has made it easier to keep a cold drink chilled! Tervis cups (or similar brands) are a great invention. They come in many different sizes, you can get a cup sporting the logo of your favorite team, and although they’re not perfect, they do seem to keep a beverage cool longer than a regular cup.

Reusable water bottles (stainless steel or otherwise) are easy to find in stores nowadays. Part of their appeal is that they’re environmentally friendly, as compared to single-use plastic water bottles. And if you set a goal to drink a certain number of refills per day, that can help you to keep track of your own water intake.

[Reaching over, grabbing my Tervis cup, and telling myself to follow my own advice]… If you’re engaged in a task, such as writing a blog post, you could set a goal to take a drink of water after each paragraph  🙂

But here’s the fun part: Create your own Spa Water!

It’s not just limited to pitchers of cucumber H2O anymore. There are all different refreshing combinations that you can try. (Not to mention, many local fruits and berries are at their peak season right now!)

Check out these ideas from some fancy-schmancy spas across the country:

  • Watermelon, lightly-crushed blackberries, mint leaves, and halved strawberries
  • Lemon, lime, and orange
  • Lemon and cucumber
  • Cucumber, orange, and basil
  • Cucumber, lemon, and mint
  • Mint and lime (“spa mojito”)
  • Mint leaves, lemon slices, and green apples
  • Mandarin orange and blueberries
  • Strawberries, lime, and cucumber

…or create your own special blend of spa waters!

It’s a simple formula:

Choose your fruits and/or veggies, and grab a pitcher of water (tap? bottled? filtered? sparkling?)… Let the flavors infuse your water, pour over ice… and enjoy. Now that’s something in the water!

 

 

Caring for the Skin You’re in: Sun Safety

Woman on beach with sunglasses

Massage therapists see a lot of skin. All colors, all textures. Freckles, scars, stretch marks, moles. Skin with lots of hair & skin with none. Skin doesn’t surprise us…

…except when it does. That brown spot on your shoulder blade? It wasn’t quite that big when you came in a month ago. And it looks less like an oval and a little more like a blob. Maybe you should have that checked out?

What happens when you get a sunburn?

You’re exposed to the sun and then your skin turns red and itchy, right? Well, yes. But there’s more to it…

When you step out into the sunlight (or drive in the daytime, or sit near a window)… you’re bombarded by UV radiation. This radiation causes mismatches in the curlicue of your DNA in the nucleus of your skin cells, which is dangerous and could eventually lead to cancer.

Your skin jumps into protective action redistributing melanin (the pigment that causes suntans, and which helps to protect your DNA from further damage).

If you stay in the sun (especially if you’re fair skinned and don’t have much melanin to go around), you start to see an inflammatory response. It’s the same kind of inflammation that you see when you sprain your ankle, only spread out across your damaged skin.

Your blood vessels dilate to get more nutrients and infection-fighting cells to your skin, making it red and warm to the touch. Itching and pain result, a warning signal from your body that something’s wrong. You may feel thirsty and tired as your body works to repair itself.

If the burn is severe, you may see blisters. With one of my most serious sunburns, my feet swelled so much that I could only wear flipflops for 2 weeks.

Eventually, even if you didn’t have any blisters, you will get flaking and peeling of the top layer of your skin. Interestingly enough, these skin cells weren’t killed by UV radiation. When skin cells recognize that their DNA has been severely damaged, they deliberately die off rather than risk becoming cancerous. This planned cell death is called apoptosis, and it’s the reason you see massive numbers of skin cells coming loose at once.

How can you protect your skin?

The short answer: Stay away from UV radiation. This means tanning beds as well as sunlight.

The longer answer: Unless you plan to become a vampire, you will probably be exposed to sunlight at least some of the time. The trick is to reduce that exposure to a safe level by seeking shade, wearing protective clothing, and using sunscreen.

How much sun is safe?

This depends on two main variables: the UV Index and your skin type.

UV Index

The UV Index is a measure of the level of UV radiation in your location at any given point in time. It’s something you can easily look up on your computer or phone before heading out the door. Some weather apps have a UV Index layer on the radar. In general, global UV Index recommendations look something like this:

  • 1-2: Low. Enjoy being outside!
  • 3-7: Medium. Seek shade at midday, put on a shirt and hat, wear sunscreen. Did you know, the amount of sunscreen you need is approximately the size of a shot glass full. Don’t forget your ears or the back of your neck.
  • 8+: High. Stay indoors at midday, seek shade as much as possible, sunscreen is an absolute must. Look for a sunscreen that says Broad Spectrum, SPF 30+.

Skin type

With the exception of people with albinism, everyone has some melanin in their skin. Those with more of the protective pigmentation are less susceptible to DNA damage in their skin cells from UV radiation than those with less.

  • Type I: Very pale, burns quickly, never tans
  • Type II: Pale, burns easily, rarely tans
  • Type III: Burns moderately, tans over time to light brown
  • Type IV: Burns minimally, tans to medium brown
  • Type V: Rarely burns, tans to dark brown.
  • Type VI: Never burns, rarely tans, deeply pigmented skin.

What about vitamin D?

Yup, you need vitamin D in your body to stay healthy. And yes, your skin manufactures vitamin D in response to UV radiation. So shouldn’t you go without sun protection sometimes for the nutritional benefits?…Dermatologists don’t recommend that route…

Luckily, there are a number of sources of vitamin D that don’t also cause skin cancer. Fish, mushrooms, eggs, & fortified dairy products are all excellent sources. Or there are vitamin D supplements. My doctor has me taking a prescription-strength Vitamin D3.

Caring about your skin isn’t about vanity.

It’s your body’s largest organ, and I want my clients to stay healthy! #naturalskinrocks

Massage therapists love skin. We work with it on a daily basis and appreciate all it does to keep your insides in, and your outsides out. Your skin keeps you cool, tells you what’s around you, prevents infections & repairs itself at a remarkable rate. So take care of it!

And maybe bring it in for a massage.

(One of) my Favorite Things…

SunGuard adds UPF30 into your clothing.

Did you know that you can add sun protection to clothing that you already own?

SunGuard is a laundry additive from the company who gave us access to fabulous tie-dyed Tshirts (RIT, that is). It washes UPF 30* sun protection into your load of laundry (as long as the fabric is cotton or mostly cotton blend).

It’s pretty easy to use: as your washer is filling with hot water, add a packet of SunGuard to the water. Then add your clothes, make sure they soak for 15 minutes, and then proceed with the wash cycle as usual. (I have to “stop” my washer for the 15 minutes, but that’s no problem; it’s just my quirky machine.)

According to the product info, the sun protection will last through 20 launderings. I wondered about skin sensitivity or irritations from using it; however, from personal experience I haven’t had any problems (and my skin is super-sensitive to chemicals).

Although I haven’t found it in local stores, SunGuard is available to order on Amazon. Consider trying it if you’d like to add sun protection to your clothes!

 

*UPF in clothing, is similar to SPF in sunscreens. As a comparison, a common white Tshirt has a UPF of about 5.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Be Safe when You’re Outside!

Blue sky and clouds with palm trees in Hawaii

Learn about Skin Cancer Awareness

One in five Americans will develop skin cancer in the course of a lifetime. (Source: the Skin Cancer Foundation)

In 2014, I was diagnosed with melanoma. It was caused by sunlight exposure… although I didn’t use tanning beds, I loved to be outside and rarely wore adequate sun protection. This has changed my life in many ways, and I try to share what I’ve learned whenever possible.

Did you know…

• Sunscreens are not created equal! Here is a resource to help you choose one with safer ingredients.

• Sun exposure adds up day by day… you need protection from UV rays 365 days a year,
even when it’s cloudy. Here are some suggestions.

• Melanoma can develop between your toes, on the soles of your feet, or other less exposed areas. Sometimes it appears as a small spot.

Watch for any changes in your skin, and visit a dermatologist to have your skin checked at least annually.

Because I’m fair-skinned and have many moles, I assumed that the melanoma was “just another mole.” It didn’t look like any of the melanoma photos I had seen in school.

My intention is not to bring anybody down, but I want to help increase awareness & help others to avoid melanoma and other cancers. If there is anything you want to ask about my experience going through treatment, please don’t hesitate.